HuSEHR Courses

Courses listed are subject to change. Please contact the respective Registrar's Office for information on cross-registration eligibility and final course schedules.

Methods

GHP 504: Applied Qualitative Methods for Global Health
Faculty: Theresa Betancourt
Credits: HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring I

The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to qualitative methods for global health research. The module is designed to expose students to a wide range of topics including: developing research questions, sampling and site selection, frequently used qualitative methods (such as interviews, observations, focus groups), design of qualitative research protocols, as well as data management and analysis. Students will engage in a variety of active learning exercises (such as constructing and conducting a short informal interview) and will work in small groups on the preparation of a qualitative research project on a defined topic area of international or multicultural health. Class activities and discussions will aim at building a research community in the class, where students support each other?s development as researchers recognizing the complexity, benefits and limitations of conducting cross-cultural qualitative research. Course prerequisite: Prospective students wishing to enroll in GHP 504 must email an essay (maximum half-page) to course TAs, by November 29. All admitted students will be notified by December 13. The essay should describe: - Current departmental affiliation, degree program and remaining time to graduation - Rationale for and interest in pursuing training in qualitative methods - Upcoming plans to use qualitative methods in research -Any prior training in or experience with using qualitative methods in field research (and lessons learned if relevant) - Research topics and populations in which the student plans to use qualitative methods.

GHP 537: Field Methods in Humanitarian Crises I
Faculty: Phuong Pham and Gregg Greenough
Credits: HSPH 1.25 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring I

This course focuses on adapting epidemiological research methods to complex settings such as disasters and armed conflict. The course begins with a discussion of the complexities of the humanitarian environment, and then works through a series of case studies to teach students the approach to population sampling and field research methods. 

GHP 538: Field Methods in Humanitarian Crises II – Digital Methods
Faculty: Phuong Pham and Gregg Greenough
Credits: HSPH 1.25 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring II

The purpose of Field Methods in Humanitarian Crises II is to expand research methods to include network sampling of difficult to reach populations. Use of remote sensing and GIS for sampling, mixed methods and interdisciplinary approaches that involve epidemiology with other methodologies, such as climate modeling and big data analysis will be reviewed. Integrated into the course will be the use of digital tools for sampling, data management and analysis.

Humanitarian Studies

GHP 543: Humanitarian Field Study Course Asessing the Syrian Refugee Crisis in the Middle East

Faculty:  Claude Brüderlein
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Winter Session

Since 2006, the Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research (HPCR) at Harvard University has developed an experiential field-based learning program for graduate students at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, School of Public Health, and Law School. The purpose of the Winter Field Study Course in the MENA region is to bring Masters and Doctoral students to examine strategic approaches for navigating the challenges and dilemmas of some of the most complex political and humanitarian issues. The Program at Harvard approaches these case studies as a means to furthering professional dialogue on complex issues, building exchanges between Harvard University graduate students and practitioners in the region, to shed light on the challenges of engaging in key dilemmas in the context of humanitarian action. Such contexts represent an extremely interesting and sophisticated political, social, legal, and policy environment for graduate students to explore and analyze the various agendas and situational factors through interdisciplinary, scientific lenses. Following successful Winter Field Study Courses examining timely humanitarian issues in the West Bank, Nepal, Indonesia, Lebanon, Europe, and India, the project will focus its attention in the coming years to the MENA region. The 2016 offering will review issues surrounding the public policy challenges associated with the inflow of  inflow of migrant populations and to the international response to the crisis.

GHP 515: International Humanitarian Response I
Faculty:  Stephanie Kayden
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring I & II

This course offers practical training in the complex issues and field skills needed to engage in humanitarian work. Students will gain familiarity with the concepts and international standards for humanitarian response. While providing a solid theoretical foundation, the course will focus on practical skills such as conducting rapid assessments, ensuring field security, and interacting with aid agencies, the military, and the media during humanitarian crises. The course culminates in a required three-day intensive humanitarian crisis field simulation (GHP 518) in late April.

Topics covered: 

  • Humanitarian response community and history
  • International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law
  • Sphere standards (shelter, water and sanitation, food security, health)
  • Civil-military relations, media skills, logistics, and budgeting
  • Monitoring and evaluation, accountability
  • Personal security, mental health, stress, and teamwork
  • Humanitarian technology, crowdsourcing, and GPS skills

Co-requisite: GHP 518, International Humanitarian Response II, Spring 2. Course note: This course is cross listed with Tufts Friedman School as NUTR324 and DHP213, and with the Harvard Graduate School of Design as SES05432.

GHP 518: International Humanitarian Response II
Faculty:  Stephanie Kayden
Credits:  HSPH 1.25 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring II 

GHP 518 is an intensive field simulation that begins at 8am on Friday, April 29, 2016, and continues through 3pm on Sunday, May 1, 2016, at Harold Parker State Forest in North Andover, MA. Students will camp for two nights in the forest as part of an aid agency team responding to a simulated international disaster and conflict. Student teams will carry out rapid assessments, create a comprehensive humanitarian aid plan, and manage interactions with refugees, officials, and other humanitarian actors. Students will face challenges that test their subject knowledge, team skills, creativity, and grit. Students will be expected to contribute a $300 course fee to cover camping gear hire, food, and other equipment costs.

Co-requisite: GHP 515, International Humanitarian Response I, Spring term. Course note: This course is cross listed with Tufts Friedman School as NUTR324 and DHP213, and with the Harvard Graduate School of Design as SES05432.

ID 205: Societal Response to Disasters and War
Faculty:  Jennifer Leaning & Hilarie Cranmer
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring I

Designed for physicians, public health officers, or others who may be charged with responsibility for intervention during disasters. The focus will be on societal response to disasters and war as well as decision-making under stress. The course will examine U.S. and international case studies within the established research and policy frameworks for disaster response and humanitarian action.

Human Rights

GHP 288: Issues in Health and Human Rights
Faculty:  Stephen Marks
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Fall II

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the application of the human rights framework to a wide range of critical areas of public health. Through lectures, cases and guest speakers, students will become familiar with the human rights perspective as applied to selected public health policies, programs and interventions. The course clarifies how human rights approaches complement and differ from those of bioethics and public health ethics. Among the issues to be considered from a human rights perspective are the bioethics, torture prevention and treatment, infectious diseases, violence prevention and responses, genetic manipulation, access to affordable drugs, community-based health management and financing, child labor, aging, and tobacco control. Course requirements are active participation in class discussion (25%), presentation of a paper (10%) and quality of the term paper (65%).

GHP 553: Human Rights Dilemmas in Child Protection 
Faculty:  Jacqueline Bhabha
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits / HKS 0.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health / Harvard Kennedy School
Fall II

A growing number of children and adolescents around the world are subjected to violence, exploitation and other forms of abuse. These harms persist despite the proliferation of international norms and structures designed to protect this population and promote its wellbeing. In many cases global transformations exacerbate rather than reduce the risks of abuse and increase the protection challenges these risks give rise to. Though each category of child protection deficit has its own characteristics and its attendant normative framework, they all share common and definable elements. An investigation of the human rights dilemmas that arise in child protection on a global scale presents, in a microcosm, a perspective on the social and political dynamics affecting some of the world's most vulnerable populations. One focus of the course is the child protection issues themselves, their genesis and impact. The other is the human rights strategies and dilemmas relevant to those (at both the individual and societal levels) charged with responding to rights violations affecting children and fulfilling public child protection obligations. In the midst of historic technological advances and significant progress in the realm of international human rights, the strategic choices and responsibilities facing leaders and others concerned with child protection are of increasing complexity and scope. A key concern of the course will be to integrate legal approaches with those developed in the health and social sciences. A recurring theme will be the evaluation of how international obligations map onto policy outcomes and how human rights mechanisms affect problems facing vulnerable children on the ground. The course will begin with a brief review of the theory and literature relating to child protection and international human rights. It will proceed with an in-depth discussion of case studies covering central aspects of child protection-child labor, child trafficking, child soldiering and child persecution. Analytic points will be derived from an investigation of specific problems, the legal frameworks relating to them, and the solutions that have been advanced to address them. Also offered by the Kennedy School as IGA 342.

GHP 511: International Perspectives on Justice for Children 
Faculty:  Jacqueline Bhabha
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits / HKS 0.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health / Harvard Kennedy School
Spring II

This course seeks to help students resolve some of the crucial challenges that arise when children interact with the legal system as victims, witnesses, or alleged offenders. By studying the many country-specific, formal and informal justice systems that exist to protect, punish, and rehabilitate children, the course will also examine a number of thematic concepts related to child discrimination, especially on the bases of gender, disability, and sexual orientation. Students will learn to rely on data from justice systems, clinical medicine, social science, and public health to inform the evidence base for discussions, and merge these sciences with legal precepts and human rights to advance actions that are in a childa s best interest. By exploring case law pertaining to decision-making within and outside the formal justice system, this course will lay a foundation for further study in the discipline, and also bolster the repertoire of professionals using the law in advocacy work. Also offered by the Kennedy School as IGA 344.

GHP 268: Field Experience in Health and Human Rights
Faculty:  Alicia Yamin and Stephen Marks
Credits:  HSPH 1.25 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Winter Session

In this course, students will acquire the basic skills in applying a human rights framework to health issues in a professional work environment. Depending on their field placement, they may learn about operational skills in settings where health and human rights are practiced or about organizing a study to investigate human rights conditions affecting health. Each student will be expected to identify an organization with which they would like to work for the Winter Session period and secure a placement within that organization. Students are expected to attend a short preparatory workshop in the Fall 2 quarter. Participants will study materials pertinent to their placement and project before heading to the field assignment. After completion of their field work, each student is required to hand in a 10-page paper to be graded by the course instructor on a pass/fail basis. Course Note: Contract with department required; attend a short workshop in Fall 2.

GHP 214: Health, Human Rights, and the International System
Faculty:  Stephen Marks
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring II

This course is designed to provide an overview of the way international institutions deal with health and human rights issues. Focus will be on the responses of the United Nations system, including the World Health Organization (WHO), regional organizations, and non-state actors to some of the pressing issues of health from a human rights perspective. Issues to be explored include: mother-to-child transmission of HIV and ARV drug pricing in Africa; traditional practices, such as female genital cutting (FGC); forced sterilization and rights of indigenous people in Latin America; accountability for mass violations of human rights; health of child workers; and international tobacco control. Among the international institutions to be examined are the WHO, UNAIDS, the World Trade Organization (WTO), UNESCO, the Council of Europe, the Organization of American States, the World Bank, and the International Criminal Court (ICC). The principal teaching method is simulation of actual cases, in which students prepare and present positions of various protagonists, based on research into those positions. The ultimate aim of the course is to prepare students to work for and interact professionally with international institutions to advance the health and human rights objectives, whether through governmental, intergovernmental or nongovernmental processes

GHP TBD: Health and Human Rights
Faculty:  Alicia Yamin
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Summer Session

Ethics

GHP 265: Ethics of Global Health Research
Faculty:  Richard Cash and Daniel Wikler
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring II

This course is designed to expose students to the key ethical issues that may be encountered in the course of conducting global health research. Using case presentations and discussion-based class sessions, students will have the opportunity to begin developing their own tools for dealing with these important issues in an applied context.

ID 250: Ethical Basis of the Practice of Public Health
Faculty:  Daniel Wikler, Nir Eyal and Ole F. Norheim 
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Fall I or Spring I

Provides students with a broad overview of some of the main ethical debates in public health policy. Helps students develop their own capacities to analyze, criticize, evaluate, and construct policy-oriented arguments. Introduces utilitarianism and competing moral theories and the strengths and weaknesses of each. Students in this course will survey some of the principal ethical controversies in contemporary public health. An overarching question will be Why not utilitarianism --for example, why not prioritize those likeliest to survive during mass casualty Why not simply maximize QALYs when deciding which drugs to fund Why not use coercive or paternalistic policies whenever they would promote health Since public health focuses on the health of populations, not individual healthcare, these controversies differ from familiar controversies in clinical bioethics, and bear resemblance to ones in political philosophy and economics. The instructors, an economically-trained physician and a philosopher, will explore this newer field along with the class. Topics discussed in the course: * Introduction and ethical dilemmas of disaster triage * The notion of population-level bioethics * Utilitarianism and other moral theories * Universal coverage in low- and middle-income countries * Priority setting in public health * Inequality and Health * Personal responsibility for health * Rosea s Paradox: Prevention or Treatment * Burden of disease: ethical issues * Distributing human resources for health * Paternalistic public health policy * Medical surveillance and privacy * Issues in vaccination * Theories of justice and health

ID 513: Ethics and Health Disparities
Faculty:  Norman Daniels
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring I

When is an inequality in health status an injustice or inequity? This course examines various aspects of this issue, bringing appropriate perspectives from ethical theories (utilitarian, libertarian, liberal egalitarian, feminist) to bear on case studies revealing a range of important health disparities. Four main cases will be discussed, each focusing on a central type of health disparity: U.S. racial disparities, class disparities, gender disparities in a developing country setting, and global health inequalities. Key questions to be pursued in each case include: when is an inequality in health between this type of demographic variable unjust; When is a policy that produces, or fails to address, such an inequality race- or gender- or class-biased in an morally objectionable way; What ethical issues are raised by different methods of measuring health inequalities; How does ascription of responsibility for health affect the fairness of health inequalities; What kind of obligations exist to address health inequalities across national boundaries; What ethical issues are raised by policy approaches to addressing health inequalities and giving priority to reducing them.

GHP 293: Individual and Social Responsibility for Health
Faculty:  Daniel Wikler
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Fall II

The concept of responsibility for health plays a key role in health policy, but it is rarely articulated or evaluated. In this course, students will consider alternative understandings of assignments of responsibility for health to individuals, the state, the family, communities, nonprofit and for-profit firms, and other entities. They will identify their occurrences in health policy debates, assess the cogency of their use in ethical arguments in health policy, and trace the policy consequences of their normative analyses. The course will also serve as an introduction to ethical perspectives on public health.

MLD 381: The Management of Crises Response
Faculty:  Juliette Kayyem
Credits:  HKS 1 credit
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Spring I & II

On paper, how a government responds to a variety of crises - whether a terrorism attack, a major hurricane, an earthquake,an Ebola crisis, or an oil spill - is fairly well thought out, practiced, and understood. And yet, when the disaster does arrive, it always appears that the government is overwhelmed and confused, as if it were making it up as it went along. This is as true for private entities. To understand crises response takes more than skills in communication or incident command; it takes an understanding of the complex political, regulatory, international, and legal regimes that govern the incident and the skills to manage these different and sometimes conflicting concerns. Drawing mostly on case studies and lessons learned, from Ebola, to Hurricane Sandy, to the B.P. Oil Spill, Boston Marathon and everything in between, the course will provide to all students a deeper understanding not merely of the mechanics of crises response but how the law, politics, and policy empower and hinder our capability to respond.

Other Relevant Courses

IGA 422: Global Food Politics and Policy
Faculty:  Robert Paarlberg
Credits:  HKS 1 credit
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Fall I & II

IGA 103: Global Governance
Faculty:  John Ruggie
Credits:  HKS 1 credit
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Fall I & II

MLD 801: Strategic Management of Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organizations
Faculty:  Nathalie Laidler-Kylander
Credits:  HKS 1 credit
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Fall I & II

LAW 2129: International and Comparative Law Workshop
Faculty:  Intisar A. Rabb and William P. Alford
Credits:  HLS 2 credits
School: Harvard Law School
Fall I & II

LAW 2482: Human Rights Research
Faculty:  Mary Ann Glendon
Credits:  HLS 2 credits
School: Harvard Law School
Spring I & II

LAW 2853: Use of Force
Faculty:  Gabriella Blum
Credits:  HLS 4 credits
School: Harvard Law School
Fall I & II

LAW 2781: History of Human Rights
Faculty:  Samuel Moyn
Credits:  HLS 3 credits
School: Harvard Law School
Fall I & II

GHP 237: Behavioral Economics & Global Health
Faculty:  Margaret Anne McConnell
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring II

IGA 106: The Politics of International Law: The International Criminal Court and the UN Security Council
Faculty:  Kathryn Sikkink, Luis Moreno Ocampo
Credits:  HKS 0.5 credits
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Winter Session

IGA 380: Human Rights Advocacy Using Video, Social Media, and Participatory Media
Faculty:  Sam Gregory
Credits:  HKS 0.5 credits
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Winter session

SBS 501: Community-based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR)
Faculty:  Justeen Kay Hyde
Credits:  HSPH 2.5 credits
School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Spring II

LAW 2202: Poverty, Human Rights, and Development
Faculty:  Lucie White
Credits:  HLS 2 credits
School: Harvard Law School
Spring I & II

LAW 2576: Trauma, Refugees and Asylum Law
Faculty:  Sabrineh Ardalan
Credits:  HLS 2 credits
School: Harvard Law School
Fall I & II

LAW 2407: Visual Justice: Documentary Film and Human Rights
Faculty:  Rebecca Richman Cohen
Credits:  HLS 1 credit
School: Harvard Law School
Spring I & II

LAW 2098: Gender Violence, Law and Social Justice
Faculty:  Diane L. Rosenfeld
Credits:  HLS 3 credits
School: Harvard Law School
Spring I & II

IGA 351: Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery
Faculty:  Siddharth Kara 
Credits:  HKS 0.5 credits
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Spring II

IGA 220: The Politics and Ethics of the Use of Force
Faculty:  J. Bryan Hehir
Credits:  HKS 1 credit
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Spring I & II

A816: Education in Armed Conflict
Faculty:  Sarah Elizabeth Dryden-Peterson
Credits:  HGSE 4 credits
School: Harvard Graduate School of Education
Fall I & II

IGA 365: Human Rights and Foreign Policy
Faculty:  Michael Ignatieff
Credits:  HKS 1 credit
School: Harvard Kennedy School
Fall I & II

WOMGEN 1271: Women and War: Gender, Race and the Politics of Militarism
Faculty:  Elizabeth Mesok
Credits:  FAS 4 credits
School: Harvard University
Fall I & II

Additional Courses and Workshops

HuSEHR students are also advised to consider courses offered through the: