Published: 
January, 2017

Individuals and organizations responding to humanitarian crises recognize the need to improve urban emergency response and preparedness – including the need to devise better methods for assessing vulnerability within urban populations. 

Published: 
October, 2017

Introduction: Urbanization has challenged many humanitarian practices given the complexity of cities. Urban humanitarian crises have similarly made identifying vulnerable populations difficult. As humanitarians respond to cities with chronic deficiencies in basic needs stressed by a crisis, identifying and prioritizing the most in need populations with finite resources is critical.

Methods: The full systematic review applied standard systematic review methodology that was described in detail, peer-reviewed, and published before the research was conducted.

Published: 
October, 2017

Multiple recent global agendas have advanced the case for resilience to underpin humanitarian action and disaster risk reduction. These agendas have been incorporated into multiple efforts but evidence to guide action has lagged behind. This study examines a specific link, often cited through qualitative research, between social cohesion and community resilience in two urban slums of Port au Prince, Haiti. Scales to measure social cohesion and resilience are applied to these communities to develop a quantitative measure of these two characteristics.

Published: 
January, 2017

This background note is part of the United Nations University project on Resilience and the Fragile City and is meant to complement the paper ‘Conceptualizing City Fragility and Resilience’ (de Boer, Muggah, Patel 2016) which formally presents the fragile and resilient cities assessment framework.

Published: 
October, 2016

This paper introduces a preliminary analytical framework that re-conceptualizes fragility and resilience at the city level. It aligns the two concepts across a range of political, social, economic and environmental factors enabling comparison across thousands of cities globally based on existing data. The framework was then partially applied to map out fragility in over 2,100 cities.

This project, funded by and in partnership with Concern Worldwide, will proceed in two phases. This first phase consists of qualitative research in the three cities of Dhaka, Addis Ababa and Port-au-Prince to learn more about the gender based violence and perceptions of insecurity faced by the urban poor and the impacts on their lives. The second phase will consist of surveys in these three cities to measure this impact. The work has just begun! Please stay tuned for updates, photos and blog entries from our team in the field.

  

Published: 
September, 2017

This paper examines the dynamics at play in ongoing efforts to cultivate negotiation capacity among professionals working in the humanitarian sector. Based on extensive interviews conducted with humanitarian practitioners, this paper addresses three overarching issues. The first is humanitarian professionals' current understanding of humanitarian negotiation as a concept. On this issue, the paper examines the difficulties of defining humanitarian negotiation and the competing answers to the question of how to conceptually delineate humanitarian negotiation as an activity.

Published: 
July, 2017

With the international humanitarian community’s capacity to respond to large-scale and protracted emergencies stretched increasingly thin, international militaries are filling in some of the gaps. This growing involvement of militaries in humanitarian response poses unique opportunities, but also significant challenges to humanitarian practitioners. Using Pakistan as a case study, this paper explores the challenges inherent in civil-military engagement during complex humanitarian emergencies.

Published: 
October, 2017

In recent years, the notion of resilience has grown into an important concept for both scholars and practitioners working on disasters. This evolution reflects a growing interest from diverse disciplines in a holistic understanding of complex systems, including how societies interact with their environment. This new lens offers an opportunity to focus on communities’ ability to prepare for and adapt to the challenges posed by natural hazards, and the mechanism they have developed to cope and adapt to threats.

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