Published: 
July, 2017

With the international humanitarian community’s capacity to respond to large-scale and protracted emergencies stretched increasingly thin, international militaries are filling in some of the gaps. This growing involvement of militaries in humanitarian response poses unique opportunities, but also significant challenges to humanitarian practitioners. Using Pakistan as a case study, this paper explores the challenges inherent in civil-military engagement during complex humanitarian emergencies.

Published: 
October, 2017

In recent years, the notion of resilience has grown into an important concept for both scholars and practitioners working on disasters. This evolution reflects a growing interest from diverse disciplines in a holistic understanding of complex systems, including how societies interact with their environment. This new lens offers an opportunity to focus on communities’ ability to prepare for and adapt to the challenges posed by natural hazards, and the mechanism they have developed to cope and adapt to threats.

November 3, 2017 - 1:00pm

The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and the Asia Center present High Ground: Disaster, Risk, Resilience in the Philippines.

Location: 

Kresge 200, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

November 2, 2017 - 4:00pm

The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and the Asia Center present High Ground: Disaster, Risk, Resilience in the Philippines.

Location: 

CGIS South Concourse, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA

The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative is pleased to support organizations responding to conflict and disaster globally. We recognize that due to the recent devastation brought on by hurricanes, earthquakes and ongoing conflicts around the world it is difficult to know how best to help those in need.  

Published: 
September, 2017

In recent years, the notion of resilience has grown into an important concept for both scholars and practitioners working on disasters. This evolution reflects a growing interest from diverse disciplines in a holistic understanding of complex systems, including how societies interact with their environment. This new lens offers an opportunity to focus on communities’ ability to prepare for and adapt to the challenges posed by natural hazards, and the mechanism they have developed to cope and adapt to threats.

Published: 
August, 2017

Doctoral student Summer Marion recently published “The Power Behind Global Health,” a review of Chelsea Clinton and Devi Sridhar’s recent book, Governing Global Health: Who Runs the World, and Why? The review was co-authored with Michael R. Snyder, a research analyst at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and published by the International Peace Institute’s Global Observatory.

Stuart Campo is a Researcher with the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In this capacity, he supports translational research on humanitarian technologies, standards and ethics.

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