Dani Poole is a third year doctoral student in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her academic and research interests are broadly in the subfields of humanitarian response, human rights, and econometrics, and cross-cutting issues such as gender equality. She is particularly interested in the health impacts of humanitarian action, violence prevention, and human rights-based approaches to population health.  

Published: 
November, 2016

Negotiations for access are crucial for the success of humanitarian operations. They also occur in contexts of armed conflict and violence that typically entrench gender identities. Building on the vast research showing that gender affects the conduct and outcome of negotiations, this paper explores gender dynamics in a humanitarian setting. After outlining its methodology and surveying the relevant literature, this paper sketches out the ways 21 practitioners at the International Committee of the Red Cross see gender dynamics affecting their work in the field.

Published: 
October, 2016

This paper presents an overview of key challenges and dilemmas faced in the protection of humanitarian action and aims to provide an initial overview of the legal, policy, and operational trends and issues identified by ATHA through its ongoing research and discussions with practitioners. On the basis of this analysis, this paper addresses three key areas. The first section highlights knowledge and questions regarding security incidents, trends, and causes of violence, including around causes and motives for attacks, and tensions between individual and collective responses.

Published: 
November, 2016

Signal Program Standards and Ethics Series - Issue 1

Data are a central component of humanitarian response. Frequently, however, there is a disconnect between data, decision-making and response. Informed decisions need to be made in the first hours and days of an emergency, and if the elements to effectively gather, manage and analyse data are not in place before a crisis, then the evidence needed to inform response will not be available quickly enough to matter. What's more, a lack of readiness to use data can even cause "big data disasters".

Dr. Valerie Dobiesz has expertise in medical education and women’s health and is collaborating on developing an assessment tool to evaluate challenges to maintaining medical education during conflict and insecurity.  Dr. Dobiesz is an emergency medicine physician at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital where she serves as the Director of External Programs at STRATUS Center for Medical Education. 

Dr. Timothy B. Erickson is a new HHI Core Faculty member with expertise in environmental toxicology and crisis in climate change. He also has active humanitarian health projects in conflict regions of Ukraine and Syria.

Dr. Erickson is an emergency medicine physician at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston where he serves as the Chief of Medical Toxicology in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

Published: 
October, 2016

Given the current humanitarian crisis in Syria where patients, healthcare workers, and hospitals are under attack, we the undersigned, without presumption of authority or judgment, stand in solidarity with our healthcare colleagues and declare their right to international health neutrality. For many decades, we have provided global healthcare professionals with education and training in humanitarian assistance in sudden onset disasters and conflicts worldwide.

Katie Farineau manages the design, production, and dissemination of educational assets under the Curricular Innovation Program at the Humanitarian Academy at Harvard (HAH).

Faine Greenwood is an assistant researcher at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, focusing on how UAV and satellite technology can be used in humanitarian contexts. A graduate of Stanford University and Tulane University, Greenwood is a former Southeast Asia correspondent and a recreational drone pilot. 

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