Evaluation And Implementation Science

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

HHI’s Program on Evaluation and Implementation Science serves as a focal point for developing evidence-based strategies to effectively help individuals, families, and populations in times of war, conflict, and disaster.  The program focuses on research and training through both macro and micro perspectives. At the macro perspective, HHI researchers are leading the development of a world-wide monitoring and evaluation system (Peacebuildingdata.org) to assess local community needs, monitor progress, and measure impact (see the Vulnerable Populations program).  At the micro level, HHI collaborates with non-governmental organizations, UN agencies, and other international humanitarian organizations, as well as local civil society organizations, to develop monitoring and evaluation research for their specific programs.

HHI has conducted research and evaluation projects related to war and disaster in the following countries: Angola, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Japan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Sudan, and Uganda.

KOBOTOOLBOX DIGITAL DATA COLLECTION

HHI reseachers Phuong Pham and Patrick Vinck created KoBo Suite, which consists of several software tools and streamlined methods to help practitioners implement rapid digital data collection projects. Together, these tools allow any practitioner to design and implement a research instrument for digital data collection, to conduct research in the field, and to then aggregate the collected data into a database. KoBo is based on the Open Data Kit, and has been widely tested in extreme conditions for ease of use and reliability.

Kobo Toolbox

KoBo Suite was created by a team of experienced researchers now based at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative who were confronted by the challenges of collecting data in a secure fashion, increasing the quality of survey data, and making results available rapidly after data collection.  Pham and Vinck first piloted this method of handheld digital data collection in 2007 in northern Uganda. The effort gave its name to the project: KoBo means "transfer" in Acholi, one of the local languages. The development of KoBoToolbox was uniquely driven by field-based needs and challenges. KoBoToolbox continues to receive support from its amazing partners. The development of KoBoToolbox and its use in the field has been made possible by grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

 
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PEACEBUILDINGDATA.ORG

The PeacebuildingData.org project has surveyed more than 25,000 respondents in ten ongoing or post-conflict countries. Through our in-house interactive internet based mapping platform, HHI peacebuilding seeks to provide the findings, analysis, and original data to the public.

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MONITORING & EVALUATION OF VICTIM PARTICIPATION AT THE ICC & EXTRAORDINARY CHAMBERS IN THE COURTS OF CAMBODIA

The International Criminal Court (ICC) and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) have significantly redefined the role of victims; both the ICC and the ECCC have identified the restoration of victims’ dignity as one of the main determinants of success behind international criminal justice mechanisms. Beyond their role as witnesses, the participation of victims is seen as crucial to the successful prosecution of those responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity. Yet, little attention has been paid to the experience of victims as they participate in court proceedings.  HHI’s ongoing victim participation research will offer a voice to the victims of mass crimes through a unique empirical research on their perspectives in international criminal tribunals.

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"OUTREACH EVALUATION: THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT IN THE C.A.R."

Public information and outreach have emerged as one of the fundamental activities of transitional justice mechanisms in post-conflict society. Their objective is to raise public awareness, knowledge and participation among affected communities. Despite this increased focus, understanding of the role, impact and effectiveness of various outreach strategies remains limited, as is understanding of communities’ knowledge, perceptions and attitudes about transitional justice mechanisms, including their expectations. The study was designed to evaluate International Criminal Court (ICC) outreach programs in the Central African Republic. Specifically, the study examines how the public gathers information about the ICC and what factors influence knowledge levels and perceptions in relation to the Court.

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TRANSPARENCY AND ACCOUNTABILITY INTERVENTIONS

HHI has been conducting research specifically on quantitative indicators and impact of humanitarian accountability. Development of formal research collaboration between the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership – International (HAP), including formal Memorandum of Understanding signed by both organizations. Further relevant research experience includes leading investigations into the provision of acute healthcare in resource limited settings and evaluation and dissemination of research in the field of global emergency medicine. Recent work on the impact of emerging technology on communication between communities affected by conflict and disaster and the humanitarian system has led to a widely-read report supported by the UN and Vodafone Foundations and the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs; the findings of this report have led to numerous invited speaking engagements over the past year, including twice at United Nations meetings, at the Global Health Forum in New York, and at research and policy meetings at academic institutions such as the Graduate Institute in Geneva.

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DISASTER RELIEF 2.0

This open analysis research project was commissioned by the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and funded by the UN Foundation/Vodafone Foundation Technology Partnership. Through a series of interviews and focus groups, this research captures reflections of members in both the humanitarian community and the voluntary and technical community. The research further provides an opportunity for both communities to come together to enhance future collaborations. The document, released in March 2011, "Disaster Relief 2.0: Recommendations for collaborative information-sharing in humanitarian crises," shared  key lessons learned about how these two communities have worked together in recent humanitarian emergencies and offered recommendations and a potential framework to enhance future collaboration.

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HUMANITARIAN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & EVALUATION

Since 2009, HHI's Crisis Dynamics program has educated students on the field of crisis mapping with didactic lectures, skills stations, and field simulation. During the annual three-day Humanitarian Studies Initiative Field Simulation, the program also evaluates how student-users adopt new technology, how volunteer teams manage information flow and produce decision-making tools, and how crowd-sourced information and real-time mapping impact student decision-making.

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EVALUATION OF CROWD SOURCING PLATFORM PROGRAM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION

Over the past year, HHI has worked to provide support to Ushahidi with an evaluation framework and a set of educational tools to help them more successfully implement the Ushahidi platforms into each organization's programming. Jennifer Chan, our lead researcher in this project, created a participatory evaluation framework to better understand how organizations implement Ushahidi’s free and open source software. Two case studies highlighted common successes and challenges experienced by organizations. This new and innovative evaluation framework was translated into three user-friendly educational toolboxes that were launched to the community in August 2011. Recognizing that innovations in information and technology can drive durable change, the research not only aimed to better understand how to further advance Ushahidi’s ideas into practice but also created tools built and designed by the community for future use.

 

PUBLICATIONS

Below are the most recently published reports from the Evaluation and Implementation Science program. For the full list of the program's publications, please go here.

victim participation 2011

Victim Participation and the Trial of Duch at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

By Phuong N. Pham, Patrick Vinck, Mychelle Balthazard, Judith Strasser and Chariya Om

The trial of Kaing Guek Eav, alias Duch (Case 001), at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) was the first in the history of international criminal justice in which surviving victims of alleged crimes could participate directly in international criminal proceedings as civil parties. In this study, we interviewed all 75 civil parties residing in Cambodia, including those who had ultimately been denied civil party status at the conclusion of the trial in Case 001. The objective was to learn about their experiences in participating in the ECCC proceedings.
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After the First Trial: A Population-Based Survey on Knowledge and Perception of Justice and the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

By Phuong Pham, Patrick Vinck, Mychelle Balthazard, Sokhom Hean

On July 26, 2010, Kaing Guek Eav, alias Duch, was convicted of crimes against humanity and grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions for events that took place three decades earlier under the Khmer Rouge regime. Following this important milestone for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), the present study was implemented to (1) monitor public awareness and knowledge of the ECCC’s work, as well as of outreach and victim participation initiatives organized by the tribunal and local non-governmental organizations, (2) assess attitudes about justice and the desire for reparations for past crimes, and (3) recommend ways in which the ECCC, civil society, and the international community can continue to engage Cambodians in the work of the ECCC.

outreach evaluation 2010

Outreach Evaluation: The International Criminal Court in the Central African Republic

By Patrick Vinck and Phuong N. Pham

Public information and outreach have emerged as one of the fundamental activities of transitional justice mechanisms. Their objective is to raise public awareness, knowledge and participation among affected communities. Despite this increased focus, understanding of the role, impact and effectiveness of various outreach strategies remains limited, as is understanding of communities’ knowledge, perceptions and attitudes about transitional justice mechanisms, including their expectations. The study discussed in this article was designed to evaluate International Criminal Court (ICC) outreach programs in the Central African Republic.

buildingpeace-seekingjustice-car_august2010

Building Peace, Seeking Justice: A Population-Based Survey on Attitudes About Accountability and Social Reconstruction in the Central African Republic

By Patrick Vinck and Phuong Pham

Decades of Political Instability, state fragility, mismanagement, and a series of armed conflicts have led the Central African Republic (CAR) to a state of widespread violence and poverty. This study provides a better understanding of the scope and magnitude of violence in CAR and its consequences, as well as a snapshot of what the citizens of CAR believe is the best way to restore peace. It also examines the issue of justice and accountability for the serious crimes that were committed. This report provides a detailed analysis of results on a wide range of topics related to the population’s priorities and needs, exposure to violence, security, community cohesion and engagement, access to information, conflict resolution, reintegration of former combatants, transitional justice, and reparations for victims.

 

nugandareport2007

Abducted: The Lord's Resistance Army and Forced Conscription in Northern Uganda

By Phuong Pham, Patrick Vinck, Eric Stover

Since the late 1980s, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), a spiritualist rebel group with no clear political agenda, has abducted tens of thousands of children and adults to serve as porters and soldiers. In the early 1990s, children who escaped from the LRA or were captured by Ugandan soldiers were often paraded in the streets in the hope that someone would identify them. This treatment prompted a group of parents of abducted children to establish the Gulu Support the Children Organization (GUSCO), a reception center in Gulu, in 1994. In December 2005, the Berkeley-Tulane Initiative on Vulnerable Populations launched The Database Project to better document abduction and help improve the capacity of 8 reception centers in the northern districts of Gulu, Kitgum, Pader, Apac, and Lira to collect and analyze information about former LRA abductees.

LEAD RESEARCHERS

Phuong Pham, PhD
Director of the Program on Evaluation and Implementation Science, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative

Patrick Vinck, PhD
Director of the Program on Vulnerable Populations, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative