Published: 
January, 2017

Visit the Signal Code Minisite

The Signal Code is the result of a six month study by the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health to identify what human rights people have to information during disasters. The Signal Code identifies five rights from multiple sources of international human rights and humanitarian law and standards that already exist and apply to humanitarian information activities (HIAs). 

In many of today’s frontline humanitarian environments, access is increasingly difficult to obtain and maintain, and continued engagement with non-state armed actors is an integral aspect of ensuring assistance and protection activities and advocating for compliance with international legal standards.

Published: 
November, 2016

Signal Program Standards and Ethics Series - Issue 1

Data are a central component of humanitarian response. Frequently, however, there is a disconnect between data, decision-making and response. Informed decisions need to be made in the first hours and days of an emergency, and if the elements to effectively gather, manage and analyse data are not in place before a crisis, then the evidence needed to inform response will not be available quickly enough to matter. What's more, a lack of readiness to use data can even cause "big data disasters".

KoboToolbox’s Question Library

The KoBoToolbox Question Library enables users to create, store, share and re-use validated questions across surveys. This speeds up the process of creating new forms and contributes to the standardization of survey questions.

For more information, visit www.kobotoolbox.org

The Humanitarian Needs Assessment E-learning program is designed to provide an overview of the Humanitarian Needs Assessment process. The process can look very different depending on the scale of a disaster, the role of humanitarian organizations involved and the resources available to any particular organization or to organizations collectively at the country level. We’ll look at assessment from various angles—from the field level to the capitol level—and we’ll see the process through the eyes of an assessment coordinator as well as enumerators on the ground.

The Building a Better Response e-learning course provides users with a comprehensive and practical introduction to engaging with the international humanitarian architecture. The e-learning component is publicly accessible free of charge.

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